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March 28th – April 2nd, 2017 / Cinema Muzeul Țăranului & Cinema Elvire Popesco / the 7th edition

Cinedans Amsterdam - Emotional Bodies

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Cinedans Amsterdam - Emotional Bodies

With the support of: 

 
Curatorial presentation by Adina Marin
The special programme dedicated to dance films returns to the Bucharest International Experimental Film Festival BIEFF due to our inspiring partnership with Europe's main dance-film festival, Cinedans - Dance on Screen Festival Amsterdam. In the ever-changing media landscape, creators are increasingly seeking different ways to tell their stories. Contemporary dance films are often autonomous art works with a language of their own and an expressiveness that cannot be pigeonholed. Cinema and dance are brought to synthesis reactions resulting in pure artistic gems.

BIEFF 2017 is proud to present the selection titled Emotional Bodies*: Anxiety, Desire and Solitude in the Post-Internet Urbanscape, with five outstanding works whose authors have chosen to embark on the ever fascinating journey to the infinite territories of human experience. With each film in the selection, we face a new type of physical language, designed to engage the emotions of the viewer to an extend no other art but dance possesses. And when combined with cinema, the area of artistic exploration becomes so vast that the inspiration may originate from the most unexpected sources. Small wonder therefore that the dance films in our programme speak about an array of emotions and circumstances ranging from the bitter experience of loneliness to the hyper-active modern jungle of the financial world, and from intergenerational family relationships to post-internet communities. Are dancing bodies capable of conveying all that? Yes, they are. All that and much more. The human body is a miraculous invention. Its physical part can twist and spin or can be reduced to paralyzed motionlessness, while the psychic side can be tormented in every way, and still it will find resources of endurance and creativity to go on dancing alone, with other humans, or even with machines. (
*title inspired by E-Motional Bodies & Cities – a European artistic exchange programme developed by the Gabriela Tudor Foundation between 2011-2015.)

There's absence and then there's emptiness, and with Néants the distinction between the two is made excruciatingly clear in four convincing and cinematically disturbing studies of loneliness. The characters endure loss in spaces once familiar and now devoid of any other human presence, but filled with relics of their formerly populated lives. Their bodies squirm as the wave of dispair rises in a crescendo masterly conducted by Nellie Carrier up to an anticlimax. In the end, we see four people wiping away the traces of their moment of distress and resuming their now futile existence. Until the next fall.

Lie on your back, arms along sides and pretend you cannot move from neck down. Does it get uncomfortable? Would you like a pillow? Do you have an itching nose?  You'll have to wait until someone comes along. Does it feel like you've already waited for hours? (There haven't been more than 5 minutes). Welcome to the world of the quadriplegic. With Paralysis, visual artist Karel van Laere submits himself to such an experiment and documents his (physically) painful and (mentally) disturbing 24-hours journey to the world of the paralysed. The outcome is a powerful statement about the multivalence of the human body, at the same time fragile and enduring, and capable of telling stories not only when in motion, but also at a standstill.

If Jung's theory is true and "every mother contains her daughter in herself and every daughter her mother", small wonder that a mother-daughter relationship is anything but smooth and rosy, since apart from an inherent conflict between generations there is a permanent confrontation with one's own self. With She/Her, Sonja Wyss goes deep into the anatomy of such a relationship, unwrapping layer after layer of feelings of resentment, disapproval, rebellion, and self-consciousness until she reaches a hidden core of delicate affection. Restrained movements portray a middle-aged, middle class comme il faut mother, defied by the daughter's rebellious outbursts. Eventually, her frantic dance fades into reconciliation. After all, her mother is nothing but a future version of herself.

A banking blog, ten dancers from top ballet companies in the Netherlands and England, and the realistic setting of London of today as backdrop proved to be a winning combination. The awarded docu-dance film Voices of Finance is named after and based on the former Guardian's Banking Blog, in which its author, Joris Luyendijk, looked at finance from an anthropological perspective. In a succession of danced monologues, the performers play bankers and others across the financial sector, who speak about their lives and describe a typical working day. Clara van Gool captures the energy of their dance which she expertly blends with spoken text. The result is a singular glimpse into the glamorous and stressful culture of the financial world.

With 
Novaciéries, the artists of the (LA)HORDE collective put forward their reinterpretation of a post-internet dance staged in what looks like an abandoned workshop. Jumpstyle, a dance emerged from the mainstream Hardcore, owes its existence to online self-broadcasting and although its coming into being is captivating in its own right, the authors choose not to loiter on the subject. Instead, the film combines performance and cinema to make a choreographed and metaphysical portrait of the post-industrial world. Masked dancers perform the characteristic jumps in empty spaces. Two forklifts join in with gracefully synchronized movements, and humans and machinery dance together to the sound of the Hardcore anthem "Hardcore to the bone" turned into a lyrical lament. Meanwhile, videos shared on youtube and other platforms interwine, announcing a post-cinematic era.

Directed by: 
NELLIE CARRIER
There's absence and then there's emptiness, and with Néants the distinction between the two is made excruciatingly clear in four convincing and cinematically disturbing studies of loneliness. The characters endure loss in spaces once familiar and now devoid of any other human presence, but filled with relics of their formerly populated lives. Their bodies squirm as the wave of dispair rises in a crescendo masterly conducted by Nellie Carrier up to an anticlimax. In the end, we see four people wiping away the traces of their moment of distress and resuming their now futile existence. Until the next fall. (Adina Marin, BIEFF 2017)
Directed by: 
KAREL VAN LAERE
Lie on your back, arms along sides and pretend you cannot move from neck down. Does it get uncomfortable? Would you like a pillow? Do you have an itching nose?  You'll have to wait until someone comes along. Does it feel like you've already waited for hours? (There haven't been more than 5 minutes). Welcome to the world of the quadriplegic. With Paralysis, visual artist Karel van Laere submits himself to such an experiment and documents his (physically) painful and (mentally) disturbing 24-hours journey to the world of the paralysed. The outcome is a powerful statement about the multivalence of the human body, at the same time fragile and enduring, and capable of telling stories not only when in motion, but also at a standstill. (Adina Marin, BIEFF 2017)
Directed by: 
SONJA WYSS
If Jung's theory is true and "every mother contains her daughter in herself and every daughter her mother", small wonder that a mother-daughter relationship is anything but smooth and rosy, since apart from an inherent conflict between generations there is a permanent confrontation with one's own self. With She/Her, Sonja Wyss goes deep into the anatomy of such a relationship, unwrapping layer after layer of feelings of resentment, disapproval, rebellion, and self-consciousness until she reaches a hidden core of delicate affection. Restrained movements portray a middle-aged, middle class comme il faut mother, defied by the daughter's rebellious outbursts. Eventually, her frantic dance fades into reconciliation. After all, her mother is nothing but a future version of herself. (Adina Marin, BIEFF 2017)
Directed by: 
CLARA VAN GOOL
A banking blog, ten dancers from top ballet companies in the Netherlands and England, and the realistic setting of London of today as backdrop proved to be a winning combination. The awarded docu-dance film Voices of Finance is named after and based on the former Guardian's 'banking blog', in which its author, Joris Luyendijk, looked at finance from an anthropological perspective. In a succession of danced monologues, the performers play bankers and others across the financial sector, who speak about their lives and describe a typical working day. Clara van Gool captures the energy of their dance which she expertly blends with spoken text. The result is a singular glimpse into the glamorous and stressful culture of the financial world. (Adina Marin, BIEFF 2017)
Directed by: 
(LA)HORDE
With Novaciéries, the artists of the (LA)HORDE collective put forward their reinterpretation of a post-internet dance staged in what looks like an abandoned workshop. Jumpstyle, a dance emerged from the mainstream Hardcore, owes its existence to online self-broadcasting and although its coming into being is captivating in its own right, the authors choose not to loiter on the subject. Instead, the film combines performance and cinema to make a choreographed and metaphysical portrait of the post-industrial world. Masked dancers perform the characteristic jumps in empty spaces. Two forklifts join in with gracefully synchronized movements, and humans and machinery dance together to the sound of the Hardcore anthem Hardcore to the Bone turned into a lyrical lament. Meanwhile, videos shared on youtube and other platforms interwine, announcing a post-cinematic era. (Adina Marin, BIEFF 2017)